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How the Internet Changed Writing in the 2000s

gigaom.com/2010/01/03/how-the-internet-changed-w... - Details

jonclayton: In a very famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”)....

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astro345 saved this page on 01/04/2010 04:20am

In a famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

inversion saved this page on 01/04/2010 04:25am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

ShantyLew saved this page on 01/04/2010 05:01am

In a famous writing from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

MyInquiringMind saved this page on 01/04/2010 05:10am

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

10khitsaday saved this page on 01/04/2010 05:15am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

biznavigator saved this page on 01/04/2010 05:43am

In a famous writing from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

Michelle101 saved this page on 01/04/2010 06:30am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

birchmanh1936 saved this page on 01/04/2010 07:57am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

JamesRouse saved this page on 01/04/2010 08:16am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

anthonyjess55 saved this page on 01/04/2010 08:40am

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

thejourneyer saved this page on 01/04/2010 08:55am

In a very famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

hdivad737 saved this page on 01/04/2010 09:02am

In a famous writing from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

kingmhg101 saved this page on 01/04/2010 09:13am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

LegacyCO saved this page on 01/04/2010 11:08am

In a very famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

steve1011 saved this page on 01/04/2010 11:16am

In a famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

mike_jan saved this page on 01/04/2010 11:53am

In a famous writing from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

curtisflow saved this page on 01/04/2010 11:55am

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

favesites saved this page on 01/04/2010 12:41pm

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

web904 saved this page on 01/04/2010 12:41pm

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

Photoblind saved this page on 01/04/2010 02:12pm

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

JoeyAtlas saved this page on 01/04/2010 02:14pm

In a very famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more people have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

rico28 saved this page on 01/04/2010 02:18pm

In a very famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

devinwalker saved this page on 01/04/2010 02:20pm

In a very famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past ten years, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

wabroker saved this page on 01/04/2010 03:50pm

In a very famous writing from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

bluewave saved this page on 01/04/2010 06:25pm

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

ianharper saved this page on 01/04/2010 07:16pm

In a very famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

TheTaylord saved this page on 01/04/2010 10:08pm

In a famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more people have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

christatro13 saved this page on 01/04/2010 10:30pm

In a very famous writing from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past ten years, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s accelerated.

me4653j saved this page on 01/05/2010 06:38am

In a famous passage from Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in forty five pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Over the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Internet, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

wind1 saved this page on 01/05/2010 07:37am

In a very famous passage from well-known Ulysses, James Joyce recapitulates the development of the English language in 45 pages — from the archaic and formal (“Deshil Holles Eamus”) to the conversationally casual (“Pflaap! Pflaap! Blaze on”). Throughout the past decade, as more individuals have spent more time writing on the Web, that same evolution has not only continued, it feels like it’s really accelerated.

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