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2 HR Issues You Can’t Ignore

humanreourcemanagement.blogspot.in/2012/01/2-hr-... - Details

afrid1: When a worker is properly classified as an employee, the employer must pay social security tax of 6.20% and Medicare tax of 1.45% of gross wages. The employer is generally obligated to also pay workers’ compensation insurance and federal and...

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afrid1 saved this page on 02/23/2012 03:41am

When a worker is properly classified as an employee, the employer must pay social security tax of 6.20% and Medicare tax of 1.45% of gross wages. The employer is generally obligated to also pay workers’ compensation insurance and federal and state unemployment tax (generally 3.5% for a new employer in Florida). Assuming that the workers’ comp premiums are 3% of gross wages, the total burden rate is 14.15% of gross wages, before applying the cost of employee benefits. It’s no wonder that so many employers are attempting to classify workers as independent contractors, especially in our current economic environment. However, the consequences of improper classification can be significant and potentially retroactive for the employer.

james_Perezz saved this page on 02/23/2012 10:53pm

When a worker is properly classified as an employee, the employer must pay social security tax of 6.20% and Medicare tax of 1.45% of gross wages. The employer is generally obligated to also pay workers’ compensation insurance and federal and state unemployment tax (generally 3.5% for a new employer in Florida). Assuming that the workers’ comp premiums are 3% of gross wages, the total burden rate is 14.15% of gross wages, before applying the cost of employee benefits. It’s no wonder that so many employers are attempting to classify workers as independent contractors, especially in our current economic environment. However, the consequences of improper classification can be significant and potentially retroactive for the employer.

rozyshukla saved this page on 03/01/2012 11:48pm

When a worker is properly classified as an employee, the employer must pay social security tax of 6.20% and Medicare tax of 1.45% of gross wages. The employer is generally obligated to also pay workers’ compensation insurance and federal and state unemployment tax (generally 3.5% for a new employer in Florida). Assuming that the workers’ comp premiums are 3% of gross wages, the total burden rate is 14.15% of gross wages, before applying the cost of employee benefits. It’s no wonder that so many employers are attempting to classify workers as independent contractors, especially in our current economic environment. However, the consequences of improper classification can be significant and potentially retroactive for the employer.

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